//
archives

Polly

I'm a journalist, based near Brighton. This blog, which is separate from my professional life, will document my reaction to current affairs, as well as some personal projects.
Polly has written 37 posts for pollysays

Machined Media and the Content Crisis

Last week I attended the Brighton SEO conference, which was basically a gathering of people who work in Search Engine Optimisation, online marketing, web content creation and PR (with the odd journalist thrown in for good measure). Amongst the inspiring talks during the day, a particular statistic from Philip Sheldrake’s Future SEO Vistas discussion really … Continue reading

Time Team and the TV Shake-Up

The archaeology program Time Team, which is a bit of an institution on British TV, is going through some serious reshuffle problems as its producers and director attempt to reinvent it. What began as a way of opening up the show’s remit and explaining the sometimes confusing processes to less enlightened viewers (such as myself) … Continue reading

Travel Bucket List

Now that I work in the travel industry, it’s fair to say that my head’s being turned by other people’s anecdotes of their adventures on a bigger scale than ever. Regardless of my job, I was hardly immune to the cult of the traveller, being surrounded by twentysomething peers who have just returned from their … Continue reading

Polly Travels: Dickens World, the weirdest celebration of Dickens yet

[All images my own]. With all of this Charles Dickens hype at the moment (February 7th will be the bicentenary of his birth), I’ve been thinking about the great man and felt the need to blog about my visit to his very own mini theme park in Chatham, Kent. The area is well suited to … Continue reading

Brighton Rock – stick to the plot, please

One of the first films I saw this year (apart from a re-run of my old favourite, The Eagle Has Landed) was the remake of Graham Greene’s Brighton Rock. I read the book in 2011 and liked its balance of intrigue and deliberately uncomfortable moments, especially concerning the amoral gang leader, Pinkie Brown. When it … Continue reading

Female Museum and Gallery Directors and How to Find Them

As part of my guest blog for Bitch Magazine online, which is now nearing its close, I decided that it would be topical (and cool) to develop a list of female directors who run museums or galleries. I had read quite a bit about the UK contingent, with the Whitechapel Gallery’s Iwona Blazwick running the … Continue reading

Masterclass in Theatre Criticism with Michael Coveney

“Aim for posterity in the context of what happened last night,” began Michael Coveney, a well-respected critic who has covered theatre for the Independent, What’s On Stage and the Daily Mail, to name but a few. He decided to share his wisdom and offer advice on how to break into this niche area of journalism, … Continue reading

Occupy London – not looking so occupied

On a visit to London this week, I passed by St. Paul’s Cathedral – the site of London’s contribution to the global Occupy protest, which campaigns against the financial abundance of our wealthiest 1%. I agree with the principle that 99% of society should not be facing severe money worries whilst the top earners stand … Continue reading

10 new careers for Fox and Werritty

With the recent news that Dr. Liam Fox has resigned as Defence Secretary due to some 44 occasions where he decided to take a friend (Adam Werritty) to work, it’s clear that the Fox and Werritty double act still has some mileage left in it. Why else would you consistently invite someone on 18 of … Continue reading

The line of innocence and guilt in the media glare

It’s been a particularly trying time for justice in the past few weeks here in Britain, with the Meredith Kercher murder inquiry reaching boiling point in re-trials, as well as the start of the Jo Yeates murder/manslaughter court proceedings in Bristol. What both of these cases have challenged with their various suspects is the notion … Continue reading

Parisian Street Art

On a recent trip to Paris as part of my PR and Sales internship, I was struck by the variety of street art on display and how nice it is to see dull buildings and pavements brightened up. Obviously there’s a line that’s crossed if graffiti is scrawled on a historical building, but if it’s … Continue reading

Saudi Arabia: women can vote in 2015, but don’t let them mix with men or drive

Electoral reform is always a slow and painful process, especially where gender equality is concerned. In Britain we began by giving the over 30s the vote in 1918, with the Representation of the People Act, even though parliament had first been presented with a Women’s Suffrage bill in 1832. Yes, nearly 100 years to achieve … Continue reading

So long, academia

This September will be the first where I have not been enrolled in an academic course of some sort, since I was five years old. At the ripe old age of 22, I am finally facing the scholarly start of the year with no agenda regarding essays, no need to remember a complicated student username, … Continue reading

The Hour: Twelve Questions to Ask

It’s just ten minutes until the final episode of this drama series, and I’m acutely aware of the amount of loose ends that need to be tied up in just 60 minutes of television. I’ll bring you my report on Episodes 5 and 6 as soon as possible but, in the mean time, who do … Continue reading

One of Your Own: Carol Ann Lee discusses her book on Myra Hindley

‘That awful mug shot’ was how the famous murderess Myra Hindley described the 1965 image that has sealed her in the public memory for decades. She bemoaned the fact that it was permanently associated with her, arguing in an open letter to the Guardian newspaper that ‘people can change’. Carol Ann Lee grew up knowing … Continue reading

Edinburgh’s Architecture, from the new to the neglected

I’m just back from a trip to the Edinburgh Fringe – a cultural feast of comedy, theatre, music, art and literature, and a yearly pilgrimage that I’ve managed to make for three summers so far (I’m aiming for a consecutive ten). What struck me about 2011’s trip was how diverse the architecture is up here, … Continue reading

The Hour: Episodes 3-4

Episode 3 A clever piece of plotting trickery leaves the audience in suspense within minutes as we open on a murder scene; it is soon revealed that we’re just part of the audience watching Adam Le Ray (Ruth Elms’ fiancee) acting in a play. Bel is keen to point out that Le Ray doesn’t appear … Continue reading

Tourism and Typography

[Images my own. Please ask before reproducing]. I’ve just returned from a week away in Norfolk with my parents and realised that a fair proportion of my photographs featured typography. It’s not really about the shape of the letters as such – there weren’t exactly many font varieties on show – but the words and … Continue reading

Amnesty International: unforgettable poster art

As an active member of Amnesty International, I was pleased to see that the charity’s Facebook page has recently begun to look back over years of tireless campaigns to promote human rights and changes in the law, each accompanied by graphic art to inspire the public. Although some of these posters were not as successful … Continue reading

The Hour, Episodes 1-2

[Images taken from Digital Spy, BBC on Youtube and ComicsBulletin.com]. I was really impressed by the first two episodes of this six-part series, which had been given the unfortunate label of the ‘British version of Mad Men’ to live up to. I don’t think that this is an entirely fair comparison, as The Hour can … Continue reading

The Best of Everything – a book that speaks to women across the generations

Rona Jaffe’s debut novel was first published in the 1950s when she was just twenty-six. The driving force for her, thematically, was the wall of silence concerning the lives of women at work and going out into the world for the first time. Though she focuses on the publishing industry in New York, the scenarios … Continue reading

Pantone addicts of the world, unite

[Click to enlarge and enjoy a spectrum of colours, including the Pantone tips for Autumn 2011 trends]. In recent years I have developed a very niche addiction: I am in love with the Pantone colour system used by designers and graphics workers worldwide. For the uninitiated, this company gives every single hue of every single … Continue reading

Stop the casual sexism, please

Apologies for the lack of blogging – I’ve been preparing for a trip to Bristol this weekend. Rest assured, I will be back to normal soon. In the mean time, I wanted to leave you with this thought, from Jeff Stelling on Countdown (Channel 4, 21st July). Whilst discussing university and degrees with Rachael Riley, … Continue reading

Glamour Magazine France (Aout/August 2011) – more than a holiday read

[Images taken as photographs of the August issue. Please click to enlarge]. Returning from a French wedding last week, I was desperate for something to read on the Channel Tunnel journey home – it may only be half an hour, but you can’t exactly look out the window and marvel at the view. Seeing this … Continue reading

New Orange advert with Potiche: it’s funny because we can’t speak French

Watch the full ad here. I’m really pleased that Orange has decided to expand its ‘Turn your phone off’ adverts to include World Cinema. This genre of film is often overlooked by the general public because of the endless subtitles required to understand the plot (unless you have a decent grasp of the language in … Continue reading

The 39 Steps: 1959 film adaptation

Not every hero has to possess the suave charm of James Bond or the action potential of a Marvel comic strip; some of the easiest characters to love are the ones who reek of normality and wouldn’t stand out in a crowd. Richard Hannay (Kenneth More) is definitely part of this brigade, and he manages … Continue reading

The Next Wrinkle-Buster – Article for Pigeons and Peacocks Magazine

Here is the second of my Pigeons and Peacocks articles – please click on each thumbnail to enlarge and view the page.This longer feature (following on from a piece by the fashion blogger Susie Bubble, no less) explores our attitudes to anti-ageing strategies throughout our lives. In the modern world we have become increasingly concerned … Continue reading

The Hour – the trailer alone is worth watching

Exploring the heady world of current affairs in 1956 England, The Hour is a new BBC drama about, well, the BBC. We follow reporters Bel (Romola Garai, last seen in The Crimson Petal and the White) and Freddie (Ben Whishaw, Bright Star) as they try to forge a career in the newsroom that makes the … Continue reading

The Next Big Thing (According to a Ten-Year-Old) – Article for Pigeons and Peacocks

This is an article (please click to enlarge) that I wrote in March, which has just hit newsstands as part of the fourth issue of Pigeons and Peacocks Magazine*. Each issue has a theme, and this one was ‘The Next…’, so all of the written submissions other than main features had to begin with these … Continue reading

Get real, WAGs. Your men are not knights in shining armour.

You’ve read the headlines. You’ve seen the photographic evidence (thank you, Ashley Cole, for inducing nausea at the breakfast table with the reports of your white underpant-clad sexting). You’ve watched wedding rings go on and off more times than most of us have had hot dinners. So when will these Wives and Girlfriends (WAGs) learn … Continue reading

Follow this blog with Bloglovin

bloglovin
Advertisements